P1.T2. Quantitative Analysis

Practice questions for Quantitative Analysis: Econometrics, MCS, Volatility, Probability Distributions and VaR (Intro)

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  1. Pam Gordon

    P1.T2.309. Probability Distributions I, Miller Chapter 4

    Hi @David Harper CFA FRM, thanks for taking the time to reply :). There's one tweak I would like to apply to this problem - let's say instead of a 12 step binomial model, we have a 8 step binomial and the rest of the info staying the same. We would now have 5 ups and 3 downs to reach $121 right? And the binomial probability will be given by: Binomial Probability [X = 5 | n = 8, p =60%] = 27.89%?
    Hi @David Harper CFA FRM, thanks for taking the time to reply :). There's one tweak I would like to apply to this problem - let's say instead of a 12 step binomial model, we have a 8 step binomial and the rest of the info staying the same. We would now have 5 ups and 3 downs to reach $121 right? And the binomial probability will be given by: Binomial Probability [X = 5 | n = 8, p =60%] = 27.89%?
    Hi @David Harper CFA FRM, thanks for taking the time to reply :). There's one tweak I would like to apply to this problem - let's say instead of a 12 step binomial model, we have a 8 step binomial and the rest of the info staying the same. We would now have 5 ups and 3 downs to reach $121...
    Hi @David Harper CFA FRM, thanks for taking the time to reply :). There's one tweak I would like to apply to this problem - let's say instead of a 12 step binomial model, we have a 8 step binomial...
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    924
  2. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.113 Rachev's exponential

    Hi @hellohi, it is small topic, I remember it studying for part 1. It is useful for part 2, I don't think direct question would be asked on this topic. But if you liked it study it. I found it useful for my knowledge!
    Hi @hellohi, it is small topic, I remember it studying for part 1. It is useful for part 2, I don't think direct question would be asked on this topic. But if you liked it study it. I found it useful for my knowledge!
    Hi @hellohi, it is small topic, I remember it studying for part 1. It is useful for part 2, I don't think direct question would be asked on this topic. But if you liked it study it. I found it useful for my knowledge!
    Hi @hellohi, it is small topic, I remember it studying for part 1. It is useful for part 2, I don't think direct question would be asked on this topic. But if you liked it study it. I found it...
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    168
  3. Suzanne Evans

    P1.T2.212. Difference between two means

    That was a long message to type on a phone - got kind of tired towards the end!
    That was a long message to type on a phone - got kind of tired towards the end!
    That was a long message to type on a phone - got kind of tired towards the end!
    That was a long message to type on a phone - got kind of tired towards the end!
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    605
  4. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.89 OLS standard errors

    @David Harper CFA FRM: Thank you for the explanation!
    @David Harper CFA FRM: Thank you for the explanation!
    @David Harper CFA FRM: Thank you for the explanation!
    @David Harper CFA FRM: Thank you for the explanation!
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  5. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.500. Bayes theorem

    Testing Amazon link
    Testing Amazon link
    Testing Amazon link
    Testing Amazon link
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    313
  6. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.121 Extreme value distributions

    Hi @SheldonZ Jayanthi Sankaran[/USER] is correct: extreme value distributions was previously in the FRM Part 1 (Topic 2) because the assigned distribution reading included EV, but Miller doesn't address it, so EVT currently is only to be found in FRM Part 2 (Topic 6) and nowhere in Part 1; i.e., this is on older question. For Part 1, therefore, you don't need to worry about it. For Part 2,...
    Hi @SheldonZ Jayanthi Sankaran[/USER] is correct: extreme value distributions was previously in the FRM Part 1 (Topic 2) because the assigned distribution reading included EV, but Miller doesn't address it, so EVT currently is only to be found in FRM Part 2 (Topic 6) and nowhere in Part 1; i.e., this is on older question. For Part 1, therefore, you don't need to worry about it. For Part 2,...
    Hi @SheldonZ Jayanthi Sankaran[/USER] is correct: extreme value distributions was previously in the FRM Part 1 (Topic 2) because the assigned distribution reading included EV, but Miller doesn't address it, so EVT currently is only to be found in FRM Part 2 (Topic 6) and nowhere in Part 1;...
    Hi @SheldonZ Jayanthi Sankaran[/USER] is correct: extreme value distributions was previously in the FRM Part 1 (Topic 2) because the assigned distribution reading included EV, but Miller doesn't...
    Replies:
    4
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    68
  7. Fran

    P1.T2.301. Miller's probability matrix

    HI @ami44 Those are really thoughtful points, thank you. Yes, I do agree with your first point: default is a random variable characterized by a Bernoulli distribution (i.e., two discrete outcomes). The default probability (PD; aka, EDF) is really the mean (expected value) of the Bernoulli such that PD = E(X) = Prob(default) or P(X = 1) Similarly, my LGD is imprecise (at best). As you say,...
    HI @ami44 Those are really thoughtful points, thank you. Yes, I do agree with your first point: default is a random variable characterized by a Bernoulli distribution (i.e., two discrete outcomes). The default probability (PD; aka, EDF) is really the mean (expected value) of the Bernoulli such that PD = E(X) = Prob(default) or P(X = 1) Similarly, my LGD is imprecise (at best). As you say,...
    HI @ami44 Those are really thoughtful points, thank you. Yes, I do agree with your first point: default is a random variable characterized by a Bernoulli distribution (i.e., two discrete outcomes). The default probability (PD; aka, EDF) is really the mean (expected value) of the Bernoulli such...
    HI @ami44 Those are really thoughtful points, thank you. Yes, I do agree with your first point: default is a random variable characterized by a Bernoulli distribution (i.e., two discrete...
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    652
  8. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.79 Hypothesis testing

    Thank you @Nicole Manley, your link is the correct reference :) @SheldonZ I fixed it above, but it's the same as Nicole already provided. Thanks!
    Thank you @Nicole Manley, your link is the correct reference :) @SheldonZ I fixed it above, but it's the same as Nicole already provided. Thanks!
    Thank you @Nicole Manley, your link is the correct reference :) @SheldonZ I fixed it above, but it's the same as Nicole already provided. Thanks!
    Thank you @Nicole Manley, your link is the correct reference :) @SheldonZ I fixed it above, but it's the same as Nicole already provided. Thanks!
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    136
  9. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.600. Monte Carlo simulation, sampling error (Brooks)

    Thank you @QuantMan2318 , nice reasoning! @ (cc [USER=27903]@Nicole Manley ) The answer is given correctly as (C) which is false. But there was a typo, consistent with the text given, it should read "In regard to true (A), (B), and (D), ..." You might notice that the explanation itemizes each of the TRUE (A), (B), and (D), specifically:
    Thank you @QuantMan2318 , nice reasoning! @ (cc [USER=27903]@Nicole Manley ) The answer is given correctly as (C) which is false. But there was a typo, consistent with the text given, it should read "In regard to true (A), (B), and (D), ..." You might notice that the explanation itemizes each of the TRUE (A), (B), and (D), specifically:
    Thank you @QuantMan2318 , nice reasoning! @ (cc [USER=27903]@Nicole Manley ) The answer is given correctly as (C) which is false. But there was a typo, consistent with the text given, it should read "In regard to true (A), (B), and (D), ..." You might notice that the explanation itemizes each...
    Thank you @QuantMan2318 , nice reasoning! @ (cc [USER=27903]@Nicole Manley ) The answer is given correctly as (C) which is false. But there was a typo, consistent with the text given, it should...
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    4
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    91
  10. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.400. Fabozzi on simulations

    Hi [USER=38486]@ good question: no, the 95% confidence interval is not used because it cannot be used and is not needed. The CI is given by µ(sample) +/- (critical t)*(standard error), where (standard error) = (sample standard deviation)/sqrt(N). The 1/sqrt(N) indicates the key relationship between the length of the interval and sample size: for any given µ, critical-t, and sample standard...
    Hi [USER=38486]@ good question: no, the 95% confidence interval is not used because it cannot be used and is not needed. The CI is given by µ(sample) +/- (critical t)*(standard error), where (standard error) = (sample standard deviation)/sqrt(N). The 1/sqrt(N) indicates the key relationship between the length of the interval and sample size: for any given µ, critical-t, and sample standard...
    Hi [USER=38486]@ good question: no, the 95% confidence interval is not used because it cannot be used and is not needed. The CI is given by µ(sample) +/- (critical t)*(standard error), where (standard error) = (sample standard deviation)/sqrt(N). The 1/sqrt(N) indicates the key relationship...
    Hi [USER=38486]@ good question: no, the 95% confidence interval is not used because it cannot be used and is not needed. The CI is given by µ(sample) +/- (critical t)*(standard error), where...
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    3
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    191
  11. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.72 Student's t distribution

    Hi SheldonZ, the df does not enter the calculation of the test statistic. Its calculated as: t = (x -mu) * sqrt(n)/ s where s is the sample standard deviation. The df comes into play at determining the critical value from the t - distribution, which you than use to compare it to the t - statistics from above, but that is not part of this exercise. I hope that helped. Addendum: Sometimes the...
    Hi SheldonZ, the df does not enter the calculation of the test statistic. Its calculated as: t = (x -mu) * sqrt(n)/ s where s is the sample standard deviation. The df comes into play at determining the critical value from the t - distribution, which you than use to compare it to the t - statistics from above, but that is not part of this exercise. I hope that helped. Addendum: Sometimes the...
    Hi SheldonZ, the df does not enter the calculation of the test statistic. Its calculated as: t = (x -mu) * sqrt(n)/ s where s is the sample standard deviation. The df comes into play at determining the critical value from the t - distribution, which you than use to compare it to the t -...
    Hi SheldonZ, the df does not enter the calculation of the test statistic. Its calculated as: t = (x -mu) * sqrt(n)/ s where s is the sample standard deviation. The df comes into play at...
    Replies:
    34
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    341
  12. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.407. Univariate linear regression

    Got it now. Thanks everyone!
    Got it now. Thanks everyone!
    Got it now. Thanks everyone!
    Got it now. Thanks everyone!
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    165
  13. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.124 Exponential versus Poisson

    @bpdulog Those are correct using a binomial P [X<=2]. Your answers match the correct 124.2 :). Given the same assumptions (i.e., accurate 95% VaR model), 124.2 is looking for a binomial and 124.3 is looking for a Poisson distribution, with slightly different results.
    @bpdulog Those are correct using a binomial P [X<=2]. Your answers match the correct 124.2 :). Given the same assumptions (i.e., accurate 95% VaR model), 124.2 is looking for a binomial and 124.3 is looking for a Poisson distribution, with slightly different results.
    @bpdulog Those are correct using a binomial P [X<=2]. Your answers match the correct 124.2 :). Given the same assumptions (i.e., accurate 95% VaR model), 124.2 is looking for a binomial and 124.3 is looking for a Poisson distribution, with slightly different results.
    @bpdulog Those are correct using a binomial P [X=2]. Your answers match the correct 124.2 :). Given the same assumptions (i.e., accurate 95% VaR model), 124.2 is looking for a binomial and 124.3 is...
    Replies:
    12
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    184
  14. David Harper CFA FRM

    P1.T2.511. First-order autoregressive, AR(1), process

    [USER=38486]@ Yes, if you look at the GARP curriculum for this year, you will see that these learning objectives are still under Topic 2, Reading 16, Diebold, Chapter 8. Thank you, Nicole
    [USER=38486]@ Yes, if you look at the GARP curriculum for this year, you will see that these learning objectives are still under Topic 2, Reading 16, Diebold, Chapter 8. Thank you, Nicole
    [USER=38486]@ Yes, if you look at the GARP curriculum for this year, you will see that these learning objectives are still under Topic 2, Reading 16, Diebold, Chapter 8. Thank you, Nicole
    [USER=38486]@ Yes, if you look at the GARP curriculum for this year, you will see that these learning objectives are still under Topic 2, Reading 16, Diebold, Chapter 8. Thank you, Nicole
    Replies:
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  15. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.108 Volatility forecast with GARCH(1,1)

    Hi @Tania Pereira Right, either is acceptable and, in the case of question 108.3 above, it makes a difference: the given answer is 2.363% but if we instead computed a discrete daily return (i.e., 11.052/10 - 1 = 3.83%) then the 10-day volatility forecast is 2.429%, a difference of 0.066%. That's why this older question of mine is clearly imprecise (sorry): the question needs to specify that...
    Hi @Tania Pereira Right, either is acceptable and, in the case of question 108.3 above, it makes a difference: the given answer is 2.363% but if we instead computed a discrete daily return (i.e., 11.052/10 - 1 = 3.83%) then the 10-day volatility forecast is 2.429%, a difference of 0.066%. That's why this older question of mine is clearly imprecise (sorry): the question needs to specify that...
    Hi @Tania Pereira Right, either is acceptable and, in the case of question 108.3 above, it makes a difference: the given answer is 2.363% but if we instead computed a discrete daily return (i.e., 11.052/10 - 1 = 3.83%) then the 10-day volatility forecast is 2.429%, a difference of 0.066%. That's...
    Hi @Tania Pereira Right, either is acceptable and, in the case of question 108.3 above, it makes a difference: the given answer is 2.363% but if we instead computed a discrete daily return (i.e.,...
    Replies:
    26
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    386
  16. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.70 Standard error

    Oh okay, sorry @bpdulog thank you for the heads-up! (you already copied Nicole so I won't again ....)
    Oh okay, sorry @bpdulog thank you for the heads-up! (you already copied Nicole so I won't again ....)
    Oh okay, sorry @bpdulog thank you for the heads-up! (you already copied Nicole so I won't again ....)
    Oh okay, sorry @bpdulog thank you for the heads-up! (you already copied Nicole so I won't again ....)
    Replies:
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  17. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.69 Sampling distribution

    Hi @bpdulog the variance is (technically) the second moment about the mean (or "around the mean"); aka, the second central moment. See As the standard deviation is the square root of variance, we can say the standard deviation is a function of the second (central) moment. The question just means to query this idea: the standard deviation of a sampling distribution is called a standard error....
    Hi @bpdulog the variance is (technically) the second moment about the mean (or "around the mean"); aka, the second central moment. See As the standard deviation is the square root of variance, we can say the standard deviation is a function of the second (central) moment. The question just means to query this idea: the standard deviation of a sampling distribution is called a standard error....
    Hi @bpdulog the variance is (technically) the second moment about the mean (or "around the mean"); aka, the second central moment. See As the standard deviation is the square root of variance, we can say the standard deviation is a function of the second (central) moment. The question just...
    Hi @bpdulog the variance is (technically) the second moment about the mean (or "around the mean"); aka, the second central moment. See As the standard deviation is the square root of variance, we...
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    95
  18. David Harper CFA FRM

    L1.T2.71 Central limit theorem (CLT)

    Hi @bpdulog, I see this as, we are asked to calculate the probability of more than 120 loans will default but we are not given the mean value. But we have pd and n as you know we can calculate the mean=n*p=5000*2%=100 that is mean or we can say probability of default is 100. Thank you :)
    Hi @bpdulog, I see this as, we are asked to calculate the probability of more than 120 loans will default but we are not given the mean value. But we have pd and n as you know we can calculate the mean=n*p=5000*2%=100 that is mean or we can say probability of default is 100. Thank you :)
    Hi @bpdulog, I see this as, we are asked to calculate the probability of more than 120 loans will default but we are not given the mean value. But we have pd and n as you know we can calculate the mean=n*p=5000*2%=100 that is mean or we can say probability of default is 100. Thank you :)
    Hi @bpdulog, I see this as, we are asked to calculate the probability of more than 120 loans will default but we are not given the mean value. But we have pd and n as you know we can calculate...
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    172
  19. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.404. Basic Statistics

    Hi @theproman23 Yes, for observations i = {1 ....n), the sample variance is [Σ (Xi - µ)^2] /(N-1), where the numerator is the sum of squared differences (from the sample mean, µ, which i am here using to denote sample mean although it should be x-bar). Sample standard deviation is the square root of the sample variance. This question is testing logic against an understanding of these...
    Hi @theproman23 Yes, for observations i = {1 ....n), the sample variance is [Σ (Xi - µ)^2] /(N-1), where the numerator is the sum of squared differences (from the sample mean, µ, which i am here using to denote sample mean although it should be x-bar). Sample standard deviation is the square root of the sample variance. This question is testing logic against an understanding of these...
    Hi @theproman23 Yes, for observations i = {1 ....n), the sample variance is [Σ (Xi - µ)^2] /(N-1), where the numerator is the sum of squared differences (from the sample mean, µ, which i am here using to denote sample mean although it should be x-bar). Sample standard deviation is the square...
    Hi @theproman23 Yes, for observations i = {1 ....n), the sample variance is [Σ (Xi - µ)^2] /(N-1), where the numerator is the sum of squared differences (from the sample mean, µ, which i am here...
    Replies:
    2
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    137
  20. Nicole Seaman

    P1.T2.405. Distributions I

    HI @theproman23 There is no sample so there is no standard error; question 405.1 is just asking about the properties of the given distribution. To contrast, let me ask a question that does invoke the standard error (which, in this case, is the standard deviation of a sample mean not a population). Here is the alternate question just for contrast: Assume a population with mean earnings of $2.5...
    HI @theproman23 There is no sample so there is no standard error; question 405.1 is just asking about the properties of the given distribution. To contrast, let me ask a question that does invoke the standard error (which, in this case, is the standard deviation of a sample mean not a population). Here is the alternate question just for contrast: Assume a population with mean earnings of $2.5...
    HI @theproman23 There is no sample so there is no standard error; question 405.1 is just asking about the properties of the given distribution. To contrast, let me ask a question that does invoke the standard error (which, in this case, is the standard deviation of a sample mean not a...
    HI @theproman23 There is no sample so there is no standard error; question 405.1 is just asking about the properties of the given distribution. To contrast, let me ask a question that does invoke...
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    355

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