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New member needing guidance

shesnaps

New Member
Subscriber
Hi everyone,

I am thinking about registering for the FRM Part 1 Exam in July 2021. I have a Bachelor's degree in Math though I haven't quite used it in the past 5 years since I graduated. I would like to give my career a new life by focusing in risk management. I have set my mind on obtaining the Schweser books plus the BT resources upon registering. My concern is that since I haven't been doing much studying would I have enough time to get back into gear for July next year?

I did okay in Statistics back in college but it has been a long time and since I haven't done much application, I've gotten quite rusty. I understand that you need a strong background in Quant to ace this test so I was wondering if I should let myself have more time and target for November instead?

Also if I select July 2021 on the Kaplan website it says that the books would only be available in March 2021. So should I select the May section so that I can receive the books in January 2021? Sorry if this question seems dumb, but I'm at a loss here.

Thank you for responding.
 

ktrathen

Member
If you have a math degree, you will have no problem with any of the mathematics required in the FRM. Each FRM topic is not particularly difficult, rather the overall difficulty comes from the number of topics. Four topics, and 60 subcategories for part 1. Any experience in financial markets will also help with intuition.

I was meant to sit the part 1 exam last November, but it got postponed until January due to COVID. I felt like six months was just enough, but then I have kids and a full time job. If you have more spare time, then six months should be achievable. I used the GARP notes and BT, and also a 2018 version of Schweser I borrowed from a friend. If I had my time again I probably wouldn't have bothered with the GARP notes, and just gone straight to Schweser and BT.

Worst case, just have a go in July, and if you fail, attempt it again later in the year.
 

shesnaps

New Member
Subscriber
If you have a math degree, you will have no problem with any of the mathematics required in the FRM. Each FRM topic is not particularly difficult, rather the overall difficulty comes from the number of topics. Four topics, and 60 subcategories for part 1. Any experience in financial markets will also help with intuition.

I was meant to sit the part 1 exam last November, but it got postponed until January due to COVID. I felt like six months was just enough, but then I have kids and a full time job. If you have more spare time, then six months should be achievable. I used the GARP notes and BT, and also a 2018 version of Schweser I borrowed from a friend. If I had my time again I probably wouldn't have bothered with the GARP notes, and just gone straight to Schweser and BT.

Worst case, just have a go in July, and if you fail, attempt it again later in the year.


Thanks so much for your reply! I have signed up for the Advanced course on BT and I'm still waiting for my Schweser books to arrive in the mail. I do have a full-time job too so I feel like that's really the most challenging part, trying to force yourself to study after a whole day of work :D Though it's been challenging to hit the books again, it's all starting to get a little familiar as I go by. Hopefully I manage to pull through this July and I wish you all the luck as well!!
 

ktrathen

Member
I do have a full-time job too so I feel like that's really the most challenging part, trying to force yourself to study after a whole day of work :D Though it's been challenging to hit the books again, it's all starting to get a little familiar as I go by. Hopefully I manage to pull through this July and I wish you all the luck as well!!

Peak suffering for me was working full time remotely (managing fixed income/FX portfolios), my wife teaching a (virtual) room full of high school students in the adjacent room, my six year old boy "home schooling" during lockdown, and my 3 year old running up and down the hallway climbing up dangerous things....all while trying to study FRM.

I personally think that the course material is so vast that it is impossible to memorise everything. I used Barbara Oakley's "Learning How to Learn" approach (highly recommended), which is just to do a little bit every day, and build up your understanding. Kind of like learning a language. You can't cram for a Japanese exam two weeks before, you have to slowly increase your fluency. Learning, forgetting, re-learning, forgetting, re-learning etc. Then after several months you'll start to feel a sense of familiarity. At least, that's what I think. I'll let you know how I go in the exam! Ha.
 

shesnaps

New Member
Subscriber
Peak suffering for me was working full time remotely (managing fixed income/FX portfolios), my wife teaching a (virtual) room full of high school students in the adjacent room, my six year old boy "home schooling" during lockdown, and my 3 year old running up and down the hallway climbing up dangerous things....all while trying to study FRM.

I personally think that the course material is so vast that it is impossible to memorise everything. I used Barbara Oakley's "Learning How to Learn" approach (highly recommended), which is just to do a little bit every day, and build up your understanding. Kind of like learning a language. You can't cram for a Japanese exam two weeks before, you have to slowly increase your fluency. Learning, forgetting, re-learning, forgetting, re-learning etc. Then after several months you'll start to feel a sense of familiarity. At least, that's what I think. I'll let you know how I go in the exam! Ha.

That sounds so intense, but totally relatable :p That's what I've been trying to do as well, though it gets frustrating when you think you've gotten the hang of something and then forgetting it the next day. I guess that's all normal then? I have to push through and practice everything as many times as I can!
 
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